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A warm welcome to Hydra author Melissa Goodman!

  As part of the ongoing Hydra Blog hop this week, I have Missy Goodman here for a visit. Melissa Goodman was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky. She’s a diehard member of the University of Kentucky’s Big Blue Nation and a lover of all things Nascar, reality television and fairytale endings. She can be contacted at MelissaGoodmanWriter@ gmail.com.

Her new book is called It’s Your Love, and if the cover is any indication, it ties a whole lot of Melissa’s interests all together in a nice package.

Here’s her excerpt:

“It’s about time,” said Kade. He was leaning with his back against the wall. He had not bothered to glance her way. He came across as if it was completely natural for him to be standing there.

“What are you doing?” She looked over her should just to be sure that God wasn’t playing a cruel joke and the blond was behind her.

“I’m an ass,” he said as if it was the only explanation needed.

So she agreed with him, “And?”

Kade stood up straight. With his hang dog expression Allie fought the urge to forgive him on the spot.

            “I’m sorry.”

“I didn’t mean to pry. I’m sorry.”

“I live a very public life. There are some things I just like to keep private.”

“You don’t have to explain,” she said, “I understand.”

 He held out his hand and gave her a wink. “So what now? Do we start over?”

His hand was Kade himself. Warm, strong with the right mixture of soft and rough. Touching him felt right. It felt like nothing could go wrong as long as she was in his embrace. It felt as if Allie had come home. If he didn’t feel the same, God help her.

Kade let out a breath that he wasn’t aware of holding when she took his hand. When Allie left the table he had considered what she said. He had even gone as far as to start his way over to the blond. About ten feet away he changed directions. He never walked away from a sure thing. He especially didn’t leave a woman he knew was willing for one that had just dumped him. Waiting outside the ladies’ room was agonizing. Kade had done his best to look like he was doing anything other than waiting for a woman. When the blond and her friends passed by trying to catch his eye Kade knew that he had dodged a bullet.

Then Allie appeared and Kade knew. It amazed him how wrong people were. He didn’t hear bells and whistles, what he heard was a soft voice that called to his soul. A missing piece he hadn’t been aware was missing until she placed her hand in his.

Sounds like a great read, Missy! Best wishes and thanks for visiting!

Lyndi

Buy links:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/178704

http://www.amazon.com/Its-Your-Love-ebook/dp/B008H50OLU/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1347397290&sr=1-1&keywords=melissa+goodman

Writers, come learn a lot for only a little at Context 25!

Do you want to be one of the first people to score a print edition, hot off the press, of my new book LOVE ME, KISS ME, KILL ME? Hydra Publications will release them at Context 25! This is a wonderful science fiction and fantasy con in Columbus, Ohio September 28-30 where, in additional to panels on a variety of subjects, gaming sessions and filk concerts, attendees can (for a minimal fee) take writing workshops provided by a number of multi-published writers and professors from great writing schools like Seton Hill.

This year, I’ll be teaching a workshop on Saturday morning about writing diverse characters:

(Saturday, September 29th, 10am-noon)
The world is full of different ethnicities and cultural groups; unfortunately, most  writers tend to only write about people like themselves. Others who want to include more diverse characters may be afraid of portraying people poorly.

This workshop will use exercises like those in Nisi Shawl and Cynthia Ward’s Writing the Other and other sources to expand your thinking about using characters of other race/class/ethnicity in your stories. We’ll look at the power of first impression—what you glean from your first sight of someone—which may or may not truly give you their essence. Participants should bring pen and paper to work through some simple but eye-opening “What If?” questions that will show you how to expand your story’s diversity. Finally, we’ll conduct an exercise designed to teach you how to convey the diverse uniqueness of your characters in subtle ways—i.e., without having Fred say, “Hi, John, this is my black friend Mike.”

The two-hour workshop costs only $20 and leaves you plenty of time the rest of the day for classes with Maria Snyder, Tim Esaias and Linnea Sinclair, as well as a multitude of panels.

The workshops are filling up, so get on over to the site and sign up!

For those who are reluctant to attend conferences because you feel overwhelmed, I thoroughly recommend this one. The people are nice, the workshops intimate, and there’s a very welcoming vibe. Definitely something for everyone here–you could attend the con to get your fill of gaming play and talk, or just take writing workshops the whole time, at an extremely reasonable cost. Tim Esaias of Seton Hill recently pointed out that his workshops are essential the same module he teaches at the University–but much less expensive. Don’t miss it!

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